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Slideshow

Helping your child at home

 

Reading aloud is essential in helping children become readers – and not just in the early stages, even when a child is able to read silently to themselves. The greater the variety of words, sentences and texts the brain has in its archive the better able it is to make sense of new texts... And the better you can read.

We relax when we listen to a text and we become used to the text. We observe punctuation signals and the rhythm of sentences. It can create emotions of happiness or sadness, frighten or amuse us, and can invigorate and refresh us. When the time comes to tackle the print, we feel prepared and replay the memory of what we heard and felt in our heads.

 

Reading + Thinking = Real Reading

Have you ever read something and at the end of the text wondered what it all meant or forgotten instantly what seemed so simple to read? We can read the words, but we're either not thinking about the text or don't fully understanding the meaning of the words. Therefore, the text doesn't sink in.

We often notice that children can decode words (i.e. work out how to say them) but that they do not fully understanding the text unless they think about the meaning as they are reading.      

Real Reading encourages children to think as they read. The children pause as they read and explain their thinking using simple thinking stems. Sometimes, they pause to ask for more information, for example, the definition for a word or to clarify something. Sometimes they notice a connection with their own life or experiences. Sometimes they notice something that they think will be important to the story. This way of reading means that the reader gains a full understanding of a text.

At home:

Try encouraging your child to 'Real Read' by using these thinking stems with them. Pause in the story and take turns at saying a completed sentence using which ever stems seem best suited.

 

Reading skill:

Thinking stems:

Metacognition (thinking about thinking)

 

I'm thinking...

I'm noticing...

I'm wondering...

I'm seeing...

I'm feeling...

Using schema/

connecting

I'm remembering...

That reminds me of...

I have a connection...

I can relate to...

Inferring

 

My guess is...

Maybe...

Perhaps...

I'm seeing...

This could mean...

I predict...

I infer...

Questioning

 

I wonder...

What if...

Why...

I don't understand...

It confused me...

How could...

Determining importance

What’s important here...

What matters to me...

One thing that we should notice...

I want to remember...

It’s interesting that...

Visualising

 

I’m picturing...

I can imagine...

I can feel/see/smell/taste/touch/hear

My mental images include...

Synthesising

Now I understand why...

I’m changing my mind about...

I used to think____but now I think...

My new thinking is...

I’m beginning to think...

 

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